Top 100 Films that I’d Recommend the Most

  • A Star is Born (2018, Bradley Cooper) – for the drama and Lady Gaga’s acting
  • Feud: Betty and Joan (2017 TV Mini-Series created by Ryan Murphy, Jaffe Cohen & Michael Zam) – for the production design and exposure of the film industry
  • 13th (2016 Documentary, Ava DuVernay) – for the exposure of institutionalised racism
  • After Hitler / Apres Hitler (2016 TV Documentary, David Korn Brzoza)
  • Snowden (2016, Oliver Stone) – recently, for exposing the US establishment with its global surveillance program
  • Inside Out (2015 Animated Feature, Pete Docter)
  • The Witch (2015, Robert Eggers) – for the production design, metaphysical ending and approach on beliefs and superstitions
  • Trumbo (2015, Jay Roach) – recently, for exposing the US establishment & anti-communist propaganda
  • Where to Invade Next (2015 Documentary, Michael Moore) – for the revelatory solutions to social issues
  • Citizenfour (2014 Documentary, Laura Poitras) – for exposing the US establishment with its global surveillance program
  • Gone Girl (2014, David Fincher) – for the analysis of interpersonal relationships and manipulation (review soon)
  • Interstellar (2014, Christopher Nolan) – for the scene with Cooper leaving, depiction of time relativity and time travel, realistic space conditions and music
  • Les Miserables (2012, Tom Hooper) – for Anne Hathaway’s and Hugh Jackman’s acting and the use of live voice recording
  • The Imposter (2012 Documentary, Bart Layton)
  • The Untold History of the United States (2012-2013 TV Documentary Mini-Series including the 2 prequels/prologues, Oliver Stone) – for the eye-opening history lessons free of lies & manipulation, and exposing the US establishment
  • The Act of Killing (2012 Documentary, Joshua Oppenheimer) – for the exposure of the CIA-backed Indonesian genocide and the exploration of human psychology in connection to film and acting
  • Wadjda (2012, Haifaa Al-Mansour)
  • A Separation / Jodaeiye Nader az Simin (2011, Asghar Farhadi) – for the commentary on principles, honesty and Iranian culture
  • The Tree of Life (2011, Terrence Malick) + The Tree of Life Official Trailer (2011 Trailer) – for the metaphysics – Possibly the greatest trailer ever made. A metaphysical masterpiece in its own rights that always gives me tears and makes me think about our paradoxical human nature and how it connects to the entire Universe. (full review soon)
  • Buried (2010, Rodrigo Cortes)
  • Embrace Life (2010 Commercial Short, Daniel Cox)
  • Inside Job (2010 Documentary, Charles Ferguson) – for the exposure of corruption at the top
  • Inglourious Basterds (2009, Quentin Tarantino) – for Christoph Waltz’s acting
  • Precious (2009, Lee Daniels) – for Mo’Nique’s acting
  • Up (2009 Animated Feature, Pete Docter) – for the sequence with the couple’s relationship through time
  • The Horribly Slow Murderer with the Extremely Inefficient Weapon (2008 Short, Richard Gale) – for the concept and the ending
  • The Enemies of Reason (2007 TV Documentary, Russell Barnes) – for the revelatory scientific info
  • Exhibit A (2007, Dom Rotheroe) – for the found footage realistic drama and the ending
  • Kiwi! (2006 Animated Short, Dony Permedi) – for the creativity and metaphysical drama
  • Pan’s Labyrinth / El laberinto del fauno (2006, Guillermo del Toro) – for the childhood drama, narrative structure and paradoxical ending
  • Brokeback Mountain (2005, Ang Lee) – for the approach on LGBT
  • Earthlings (2005 Documentary, Shaun Monson) – for the exposure of industrial animal abuse
  • Grizzly Man (2005 Documentary, Werner Herzog) – for the art and dark metaphysics (review soon)
  • Twist of Faith (2004 Documentary, Kirby Dick) – for the analysis of the psychology and sociology surrounding child abuse
  • A Decade Under the Influence (2003 Documentary, Ted Demme & Richard LeGravenese) – for the info on film history (American New Wave)
  • Da Ali G Show: Seasons 2 & 3 (2003-2004 TV Series created by Sacha Baron Cohen) – for the absurd comedy
  • The Iceman and the Psychiatrist (2003 TV Documentary, Arthur Ginsberg) – for the lessons on human psychology
  • Memories of Murder (2003, Joon-ho Bong) – for the ending
  • Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr. (2001, David Lynch) – for the lessons on film conventions and acting – Brilliant Lesson on the Magic of Film & Acting. In the theatre scene, the man on stage clearly explains in the beginning of the show that everything is fake. He introduces a guy singing at a trumpet, but then the guy stops singing, yet the song continues. You understand it was not him singing. In spite of this, right afterwards you get fully dragged into believing the woman on stage. Her singing shakes you to the core. But then you see her falling to the ground, yet again the song continues. Of course, it was not her singing. Seconds ago you were clearly warned that everything is fake, yet the performance made you instantly forget all that. And David Lynch places the two leads as audiences in the theater. You see them having transformative experiences just like yours, at the same time with you. You realise that you are the audience. You are looking at yourself being transformed by the performance on stage and forgetting that nothing is real. The man on stage, suggestively dressed as illusionist, is David Lynch telling you “See, I told you it’s fake, yet you still believed it! That’s the power of filmmaking & performing arts!”.
  • My Voyage to Italy / Il mio viaggio in Italia (1999 TV Documentary, Martin Scorsese) – for the revelatory info on film history
  • The Straight Story (1999, David Lynch) – for the ending, approach to life in general and for Richard Farnsworth’s acting
  • The Celebration / Festen (1998, Thomas Vinterberg) – for the realism and Dogme 95 concept
  • Titanic (1997, James Cameron) – for the grandiosity and the apocalyptic and social metaphors – Apocalyptic Film in Disguise. Titanic is an apocalyptic film disguised as romance/disaster drama. That’s where its true value lies. The ship is a metaphor for the entire world: our little planet floating in a vast and dark universe, encompassing both humankind’s greatest ambitions/achievements and worst morals, with people divided into classes of rich, middle and poor. This way the social conflicts on Titanic transcend into a commentary on world issues, and when the Titanic sinks, the world ends. If only James Cameron made the metaphor clearer – he kept it too much in the background, probably for commercial purposes. P.S. I’ve recently watched an old interview with James Cameron and was surprised to hear him saying similar things. I was totally unaware of this at the time of writing the review.
  • Secrets & Lies (1996, Mike Leigh) – for the realism
  • Groundhog Day (1993, Harold Ramis) – for the concept and the comedy
  • Thelma & Louise (1991, Ridley Scott) – for the feminism
  • GoodFellas (1990, Martin Scorsese) – for Joe Pesci’s acting and the “funny how?” scene
  • Misery (1990, Rob Reiner) – for Kathy Bates’ acting
  • Isle of Flowers / Ilha das Flores (1989 Documentary Short, Jorge Furtado) – for the creativity and the social message in the ending
  • The Decalogue: One / Dekalog, jeden (1989 TV Episode, Krzysztof Kieslowski) – for the metaphysical drama and European art
  • Roger & Me (1989 Documentary, Michael Moore) – for the exposure of capitalism with its social issues and for the narrative structure
  • The Land Before Time (1988 Animated Feature, Don Bluth) – for the scene with mother’s shadow, the approach on ephemerality of life, circle of life, segregation and children’s universe (review soon)
  • Time of the Gypsies / Dom za vesanje (1988, Emir Kusturica) – for the complex drama and magical realism
  • The Color Purple (1985, Steven Spielberg) – for Oprah Winfrey’s acting
  • Blade Runner (1982, Ridley Scott) – for the paradoxical ending/character and the metaphysics of artificial intelligence
  • Koyaanisqatsi (1982 Experimental Documentary, Godfrey Reggio) – for the visual spectacle and metaphysics in the second half
  • Carrie (1976, Brian De Palma) – for the paradoxical character, dramatic intensity, approach on bullying, teen drama, Sissy Spacek’s acting, prom scene and mom scene at the end
  • Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese) – for the antihero concept, paradoxical character and Robert de Niro’s acting
  • Barry Lyndon (1975, Stanley Kubrick) – for the cinematography, rhythm and attention to details
  • Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975, Peter Weir) – for the atmospheric mystery and teen drama
  • Chinatown (1974, Roman Polanski) – for the ending
  • Hearts and Minds (1974 Documentary, Peter Davis) – for the exposure of government manipulation, war, and for the narrative structure and exploration of human psychology
  • The Last House on the Left (1972, Wes Craven)
  • The Eye of the Storm (1970 TV Documentary, William Peters) + Frontline: A Class Divided (1985 TV Documentary Episode, William Peters) – for the revelatory info on the psychology and sociology of racism and discrimination
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick) – for the general vision, metaphysics, art, use of music, realistic space conditions, the scene with the monolith in the room
  • Bonnie and Clyde (1967, Arthur Penn) – for the antihero concept, dark romance and boldness/rebel spirit
  • Empire (1964 Experimental Film, Andy Warhol) – for the experimental concept breaking the limits of cinema
  • Scorpio Rising (1963 Experimental Short, Kenneth Anger) – for rebellious art
  • The Haunting (1963, Robert Wise) – for the psychological and atmospherical horror
  • L’Eclisse (1962 Experimental Film, Michelangelo Antonioni) – for the ending sequence
  • What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962, Robert Aldrich) – for Bette Davis’ acting
  • Peeping Tom (1960, Michael Powell) – for being bold and ahead of its times and for the paradoxical character
  • The 400 Blows / Les quatre cents coups (1959, Francois Truffaut) – for the childhood drama and the ending
  • Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)
  • 12 Angry Men (1957, Sidney Lumet)
  • Paths of Glory (1957, Stanley Kubrick) – for the idealism and the ending with the German girl
  • The Seventh Seal / Det sjunde inseglet (1957, Ingmar Bergman) – for the metaphysics and the dark European art
  • One Froggy Evening (1955 Animated Short, Chuck Jones) – for the greed satire and creativity
  • Journey to Italy / Viaggio in Italia (1954, Roberto Rossellini) – for the ending
  • I Vitelloni (1953, Federico Fellini)
  • Forbidden Games / Jeux interdits (1952, Rene Clement) – for the childhood drama, children’s universe, the ending and Brigitte Fossey’s acting, recently rewatched – We are all running through life endlessly searching for Michel… (full review soon)
  • Bicycle Thieves / The Bicycle Thief / Ladri di biciclette (1948, Vittoria De Sica) – for the neorealism
  • It’s A Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra) – for the fantastic moralising drama
  • Bambi (1942 Animated Feature) – for the circle of life drama
  • The Night Before Christmas (1941 Animated Short, William Hanna & Joseph Barbera) – for the ending
  • The Great Dictator (1940, Charles Chaplin) – for the comedy and creativity
  • The Shop Around the Corner (1940, Ernst Lubitsch)
  • The Wizard of Oz (1939, Victor Fleming, King Vidor & George Cukor) – for the ending and the contrast between the two worlds
  • Olympia (1938 Documentary, Leni Riefenstahl) – for the diving sequence
  • Modern Times (1936, Charles Chaplin)
  • Bride of Frankenstein (1935, James Whale) – for the paradoxical character, the exploration of human nature and prejudice, the scene with the blind man
  • King Kong (1933, Merian C. Cooper & Ernest B. Schoedsack) – for the paradoxical character and grandiosity of cinema
  • Freaks (1932, Tod Browning) – for being so much ahead of its times and for the lessons on human nature and morality via both casting choices and story, rewatched twice recently – Tod Browning Goes for Your Empathy, Not Your Sympathy. In the beginning, Tod Browning is telling us that we are the real freaks, we who consider ourselves superior and look down on his disabled performers. So much that we and not them need to be accepted (the famous “we accept her, one of us” scene). But does he try to idealise their morals in order to awaken our sympathy? No. In the end he shows them to also be brutally vengeful, so that we can see our own paradoxical human nature reflected in theirs. This way our empathy awakens and we truly learn that we’re all the same, regardless of our physical differences. Unfortunately, Tod Browning’s original 90 min version no longer exists, only the abridged 64 min studio version survived with a happy ending added by the studio.
  • M (1931, Fritz Lang) – for the film language
  • Man with a Movie Camera / Chelovek s kino-apparatom (1929 Experimental Documentary, Dziga Vertov) – for the metaphysics in the ending scenes
  • Napoleon (1927, Abel Gance) – for the visual style and camera movements ahead of its time
  • The Gold Rush (1925, Charles Chaplin) – for the overall narrative perfection